Tutorial II: Automated Sample Preparation for LC and GC methods in food, forensic and material

Shanghai New International Expo Center (SNIEC) Conference Room M12 (1st floor) in Hall E1
  • Automated Sample Preparation for LC and GC methods in food, forensic and material

  • Yunyun Nie

    Yunyun Nie: Joined GERSTEL GmbH & Co. KG, Germany, as an application chemist in R&D department in 2010. Since beginning of 2015 she is responsible as a technical product manager for project management in R&D. In addition since 2017 she is strategic product coordinator for China. She is specialist for Stir Bar Solid Extraction and material emissions (directly thermal extraction and chamber method); she holds a MSc. degree from the faculty of chemistry, water science, from University Duisburg-Essen (Germany) and a Bachelor degree in Environmental Engineering from Shanghai Universitiy (SHU).

    Automated Sample Preparation for LC and GC methods in food, forensic and material

    Automation of sample preparation in analytical laboratories is typically implemented for multiple reasons. Quite often, the main driver is the demand to increase laboratory efficiency by increasing sample throughput or reducing the need for labor intensive manual processing steps. A second demand, less often considered but never the less important, is improved quality assurance and traceability. In this tutorial, examples of successfully implemented automated sample preparation procedures that address these demands are presented. The examples cover food, anti-doping and forensic analysis as well as analysis related to materials research.
    Especially in food analysis, increasing sample throughput has been a driving force for developing less complex sample preparation procedures that are easily automated. A well known example is the QuEChERS method, a fast sample preparation method originally developed for the analysis of non-fatty foods by Anastasiades et al. [1]. This method has been modified and improved for different purposes over time. The acronym stands for “Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe".
    In forensic laboratories, quality assurance is an important issue because of the demand for well documented and traceable analytical results. Automated sample preparation helps to fulfill these requirements: Every step performed in sample preparation and analysis is documented in instrument methods and recorded in log files. Examples are shown including dried blood spot (DBS) analysis used in anti-doping control as well as analysis of hair used for monitoring drugs of abuse.
    A third topic covered in the tutorial is from materials research, specifically the determination of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) affecting indoor air quality. For this kind of analysis standardized test methods have been developed that reflect real life use of the material. Automation can help to increase reproducibility and comparability of these test scenarios. Keywords are “emission chamber testing” and “thermal extraction”. The methods used were developed to support indoor air quality work (e.g. Din 16000-09) or methods from the automobile industry including VDA 277 and VDA 278. Examples will show how automated chamber testing in small chambers can be applied to VOC emission testing. Finally, new automation techniques for improved formaldehyde emission monitoring of materials used indoors in buildings will be discussed.
    1] M. Anastassiades, S. Lehotay, D. Stajnbaher and F. Schenck; J. AOAC Int 86(2) (2003) 412-31

  • Shalene Goh, PhD

    Shalene Goh, PhD: Joined GERSTEL LLP, Singapore, as an application chemist in 2017. She holds a PhD in Chemistry from the National University of Singapore (NUS). She is expert for sample preparation with chromatography / mass spectrometer, especially implementing automated miniaturised extraction techniques.

    Automated Sample Preparation for LC and GC methods in food, forensic and material

    Automation of sample preparation in analytical laboratories is typically implemented for multiple reasons. Quite often, the main driver is the demand to increase laboratory efficiency by increasing sample throughput or reducing the need for labor intensive manual processing steps. A second demand, less often considered but never the less important, is improved quality assurance and traceability. In this tutorial, examples of successfully implemented automated sample preparation procedures that address these demands are presented. The examples cover food, anti-doping and forensic analysis as well as analysis related to materials research.
    Especially in food analysis, increasing sample throughput has been a driving force for developing less complex sample preparation procedures that are easily automated. A well known example is the QuEChERS method, a fast sample preparation method originally developed for the analysis of non-fatty foods by Anastasiades et al. [1]. This method has been modified and improved for different purposes over time. The acronym stands for “Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe".
    In forensic laboratories, quality assurance is an important issue because of the demand for well documented and traceable analytical results. Automated sample preparation helps to fulfill these requirements: Every step performed in sample preparation and analysis is documented in instrument methods and recorded in log files. Examples are shown including dried blood spot (DBS) analysis used in anti-doping control as well as analysis of hair used for monitoring drugs of abuse.
    A third topic covered in the tutorial is from materials research, specifically the determination of emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) affecting indoor air quality. For this kind of analysis standardized test methods have been developed that reflect real life use of the material. Automation can help to increase reproducibility and comparability of these test scenarios. Keywords are “emission chamber testing” and “thermal extraction”. The methods used were developed to support indoor air quality work (e.g. Din 16000-09) or methods from the automobile industry including VDA 277 and VDA 278. Examples will show how automated chamber testing in small chambers can be applied to VOC emission testing. Finally, new automation techniques for improved formaldehyde emission monitoring of materials used indoors in buildings will be discussed.
    1] M. Anastassiades, S. Lehotay, D. Stajnbaher and F. Schenck; J. AOAC Int 86(2) (2003) 412-31

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